New York Times columnist Roger Cohen gives warning of a global apocalypse due to American foreign-policy fatigue, ingeniously using a mix of tenses that challenges the reader to descry whether the catastrophe has already happened, or is still to come, or may, indeed, be completely imaginary:

It was a time of fever. People in West Africa bled from the eyes. It was a time of disorientation. Nobody connected the dots or read Kipling on life’s few certainties: “The Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire / And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire.” Until it was too late and people could see the Great Unraveling for what it was and what it had wrought …

Would you make a good literary editor?  See if you can spot any problems in these lines. They come from a book review published in The Economist, since removed from its original URL, but accessible by means of a further link, with a warning

Mr Baptist cites the testimony of a few slaves to support his view that these rises in productivity were achieved by pickers being driven to work ever harder by a system of “calibrated pain” … Slave owners surely had a vested interest in keeping their “hands” ever fitter and stronger to pick more cotton. Some of the rise in productivity could have come from better treatment. Mr Baptist has not written an objective history of slavery. Almost all the blacks in his book are victims, almost all the whites villains. This is not history; it is advocacy.

 

Two years ago Newsweek revealed that the identity of Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto was, in fact, Satoshi Nakomoto. But such was Satoshi Nakamoto’s influence that the Newsweek story was deblockchained from the Internet along with most of the Wayback links:

Far from leading to a Tokyo-based whiz kid using the name “Satoshi Nakamoto” as a cipher or pseudonym (a story repeated by everyone from Bitcoin’s rabid fans to The New Yorker), the trail followed by Newsweek led to a 64-year-old Japanese-American man whose name really is Satoshi Nakamoto. He is someone with a penchant for collecting model trains and a career shrouded in secrecy, having done classified work for major corporations and the U.S. military …